Thursday, February 12, 2015

40K and Wondering If My Muse in On Vacation

(I write about my writing process mostly as a way to help myself out and understand what I'm doing. It's the blog equivalent of holding imaginary rants in the shower while you wash your hair, lol) 
   As some of you may know, I am currently working on One Glimpse, the second book in the Indulgence Series (Don't worry. I won't ever reveal spoilers in any of my posts). The hardest part about many novels is, I think, the "setup". How do the main characters know each other? Do they already, or do I have to write a scene where they meet? Are there necessary back stories? Etc. Sometimes, it can feel like I'm building a ballroom brick by brick so the dancers can finally dance. Ugh. But, it's necessary. I've never been a fan of the love-at-first-sight trope mostly because I can't personally see it as realistic. And if I can't buy it, I can't write it.

Now...lust at first sight? I'll definitely buy that as being realistic. ;)

I also had to go back and do some major revisions on the first three chapters, including the creation of new character and a subplot that wasn't there before. I don't usually write in the "puzzle piece" format (writing scenes out of sequence and then putting them together), and in this case I realized that if I didn't add a subplot earlier I was going to have to do just that later. It all relates to the villain and his motivation.

Villains and Motive
     I find it difficult to understand, and thereby accept, villains that don't have a realistic motive for their behavior. I realize that there are people in the world who are just jerks, who just want to hurt other people for their own amusement or pleasure, but they are truly rare. Most bad people have some kind of identifiable motive, be it money, power, reputation, revenge, etc. It was as I was writing my villain at the 40K mark that I realized his dislike for Sam (our hero) at that point was too shallow to go much further. I needed to give him more motivation, otherwise the things he will do (which I haven't written yet ;) will seem strange for such a thin, mildly confrontational relationship. Hence the addition of the subplot.

The subplot also helps me to bring other people into the story, as I felt it was becoming a bit too "islandish" with just the two main characters.

No comments:

Post a Comment